Corridor Elementary School

Current Status:

Entry Level - Certified on 3/19/14, Expires on 3/19/17

About the Corridor OGS Program:

We have an incredibly collaborative staff that is all on board.  When the green team says what to do, people truly do it.  We all practice this way of living at home, and so we teach it to our students anyway, because we know the importance of it.  Students buy in because they understand the Earth is fragile and materials are limited thanks to our lessons with them.

How do you publicize your program?

We put things in our school newsletter and on our website, as well.

How does your parent group (PTA/PTO) participate and support your program?

We collaborate a lot with our PTO and families.  We often get volunteers to help do projects, like our school garden, or to organize a special project involving reusable materials.  We have also reached out to programs such as the School Garden Project. We have had a weird year this year due to a change in leadership (our principal is new).  However, our parent group has held strong and worked with us to keep things rolling as best as we can.  All we have to do is ask!  Of course they are the ones sending their child with reusable materials, as well.

How do you practice resource conservation in your everyday operations?

Our school is excellent with reducing and reusing materials.  In our start of the year newsletter, we ask families to pack using reusable materials.  Between our school and the other one, we barely fill one garbage during our lunch, which has over 600 students combined between the two buildings.  That's impressive, if you ask me.   We also try to reuse the backs of papers for things (I guess that would a reuse, too!), cut paper in half to get double the use out of it, and try to use large bottles instead of many small ones for classroom supplies and materials (glue, soaps, etc).  We are also efficient with reuse of materials.  Often for art or school projects, students will create something using a material from home or school, such as plastic bottles, cans, or cardboard.  Kids bring their own reusable water bottles versus bringing a new one every day, or running water from the wasteful water fountains (barely get it in your mouth!).  Also, we have many partnerships with families in our school that have businesses or hobbies in which they have materials we can use for things.  For example, a dad who owns a print shop often saves things for us, such as scrap paper, in order for us to reuse the pieces for things at our building. 

Corridor is fantastic with energy usage.  Our students practice a "turn it off if we're out" policy in our classrooms.  They created signs which are posted at every light switch as a constant reminder.  Also, due to budget cuts, our building has drastically cut the amount of time we use our lights because we know it saves us money.  On top of that, a lot of teachers took a lot of their plug-in items for luxury (microwaves, small refrigerators, for example) home to try to save money and electricity.  My classroom, as well as others, try very hard to use natural light by turning off classroom lights and using the sun (when it is out!).

Reducing water usage has been a struggle, as with a very large, populated, and outdated building, our water system is pretty tough to maintain and keep drip free.  We have taught kids how to wash their hands quickly by turning on and off the faucets at certain times to save water.  Likewise, we teach the kids the importance of reusable water bottles, because when we all stand in line and run our fast-running water fountains, much of the water is rushing down the drain.  We would love to have a newer building or to have materials installed, such as sensor water faucets for our bathrooms to help with water reduction

These are just a few of the many ways we try to be green.

Data Collection and Monitoring (Important Info):

- Our last Waste Audit was on 4/24/13

- Approximate Recovery Rate: 40%

How we Reduce and Reuse:

  • We ask families to pack using reusable materials. 

  • Between our school and the other one, we barely fill one garbage during our lunch, which has over 600 students combined between the two buildings.  That's impressive, if you ask me.  

  • We also try to reuse the backs of papers for things (I guess that would a reuse, too!), cut paper in half to get double the use out of it,

  • We try to use large bottles instead of many small ones for classroom supplies and materials (glue, soaps, etc). 

  • Often for art or school projects, students will create something using a material from home or school, such as plastic bottles, cans, or cardboard. 

  • Kids bring their own reusable water bottles versus bringing a new one every day, or running water from the wasteful water fountains (barely get it in your mouth!). 

  • Also, we have many partnerships with families in our school that have businesses or hobbies in which they have materials we can use for things.  For example, a dad who owns a print shop often saves things for us, such as scrap paper, in order for us to reuse the pieces for things at our building. 

  • These are just a few of the many ways we try to be green.

How we Save Energy/Water:

  • Our students practice a "turn it off if we're out" policy in our classrooms. 

  • Students created signs which are posted at every light switch as a constant reminder. 

  • Due to budget cuts, our building has drastically cut the amount of time we use our lights because we know it saves us money. 

  • A lot of teachers took a lot of their plug-in items for luxury (microwaves, small refrigerators, for example) home to try to save money and electricity. 

  • My classroom, as well as others, try very hard to use natural light by turning off classroom lights and using the sun (when it is out!).

  • Reducing water usage has been a struggle, as with a very large, populated, and outdated building, our water system is pretty tough to maintain and keep drip free. 

  • We have taught kids how to wash their hands quickly by turning on and off the faucets at certain times to save water. 

  • We teach the kids the importance of reusable water bottles, because when we all stand in line and run our fast-running water fountains, much of the water is rushing down the drain.  We would love to have a newer building or to have materials installed, such as sensor water faucets for our bathrooms to help with water reduction.

Current Goals:

Reduce Waste - Goal 1: Restart our Cafeteria Compost Collection.

Steps-to-Achieve: 

1. Request that our interim and incoming custodial staff run the lunch time compost station in the cafeteria.

2. Talk to the faculty about restarting the compost, and ensure they are teaching their students how to compost. 

3. Reimplement the "teaching" day for students once or twice each year.

4. Ensure the cart is out at lunch everyday.

5. An adult and student council will remove the compost and take it to the garden bins.

6. We will talk to the city about adding a bin for meats/breads/etc for Love Food Not Waste.

Reduce Waste - Goal 2: Restart use of worm bins.

Steps-to-Achieve: 

1. Clean, prepare and reload our worm bins with worms from the local agency that donated them. 

2. Ensure that students and parents are organized to take our cafeteria compost to the garden.

3. Make use of an ongoing signup sheet, located in a common area, for students and parents to signup for taking the compost out and tending the bins.

Recycling - Goal 1: To lower our recyclable percentage in the garbage through education.

Steps-to-Achieve: 

1. Assure staff and students know what needs to go into the recycling bins by posting signs in hallways and in the cafeteria.

2. Continue educating staff and students through our electives to teach about recycling.

Recycling - Goal 2: To lower our recycling percentage in the garbage through access to bins.

Steps-to-Achieve: 

1. Restart using the recycling/compost station at lunch times.

2. Ensure that the interim and incoming custodial staff know how to use and maintain the recycling/compost station.

Energy - Goal 1: Reduce energy use through promoting throughout the school.

Steps-to-Achieve: 

1. We will post posters and reminder signs in public areas like hallways, bathrooms, cafeteria and classrooms.

2. We will schedule a review of the signs at least once a year.

Energy - Goal 2: Educate students about energy conservation.

Steps-to-Achieve: 

1. We will offer energy conservation education in our electives and classroom curriculum.

2. We will post at least one large poster in the hallway, etc. explaining the importance of conserving energy.

Water - Goal 1: Reduce water use through promoting throughout the school.

Steps-to-Achieve: 

1. We will post posters and reminder signs in public areas like hallways, bathrooms, cafeteria and classrooms. We will schedule a review of the signs at least once a year.

Water - Goal 2: Educate students about water conservation.

Steps-to-Achieve: 

1. We will offer water conservation education in our electives and classroom curriculum.

2. We will post at least one large poster in the hallway, etc. explaining the importance of conserving water.

Upcoming Events:

- Nothing right now!

Ongoing Projects:

(1) Recycling

(2) Monitoring – What’s in that smelly dumpster?

Would you like to help Corridor at being greener?

 

Contact Joshua Frankel – greenschools@live.com / 541-636-0096. He is the local OGS coordinator, and he will get you everything you need including:

  • The Oregon Green Schools application.

  • The information you need to schedule your waste audit/garbage sort.

  • A list of sample goals.

Together we can help your school save money, reduce waste, and conserve energy/water. Thanks for participating in the Oregon Green Schools program!

(This page was updated: 9/24/16.)